Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal

Curator Nicholas Chambers、Gong Yan
Co-Curators Andy Warhol
Organizer Andy Warhol Museum、PSA
Chief Sponsor BNY Mellon

Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal is on tour in Asia with all pieces from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. The exhibition covers Warhol's career from the 1930s to the 1980s and is divided into four sections, displaying more than 400 pieces of different kinds including paintings, photographs, silk printing, sketches, sculpture and films.   Signature pieces: Campbell's Soup Can (1961), Silver Liz (1963), Jackie (1964), Marilyn Monroe (1967), Self-Portrait (1986).


Part One:1930s-1940s Formative Years

Andy Warhol grew up in an immigrant family struggling to make a living in America. Like scores before them, Warhol’s parents, Andrej and Julia Warhola, left their homeland in Eastern Europe in the 1930s in search of a better life. Devout followers of the Eastern Orthodox Church, the family regularly attended mass and observed the rich traditions of their Eastern European heritage.

Warhol’s parents encouraged the development of his creative talents from early on in his childhood. They enrolled him in Saturday art classes at the Carnegie Institute, which Warhol attended for three years beginning in the fourth grade. In 1945, Warhol enrolled at the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University).

In 1949, Warhol earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the school’s highly regarded Painting and Design Department. During these years, he developed his talent and skill as an artist and stood out among his peers because of his fresh and innovative ideas.

Part Two:1950s Life in New York

Immediately after graduating from college in 1949, Andy Warhol left Pittsburgh for New York, and went on to become one of the most successful illustrators of the 1950s. This section showcases some of Warhol's drawings and illustrations from that period, including those he created for I. Miller which were an unprecedented success and earned him a reputation as a drawer of shoes.

Part Three: 1960s The Factory Years

This decade was an important period in Warhol's career, where he devoted more energy to painting, and turned to newspapers, advertisements, comic strips, and other areas of pop culture material for subject matter. In July 1962 Warhol had his first solo show of Pop Art, exhibiting his Campbell’s Soup Can paintings. Warhol later moved to east New York to his silver painted 'Factory' studio, where he made larger-scale paintings, sculptures and films. By the late 1960s, Warhol’s paintings had become definitive emblems of American Pop Art.  This section showcases many Warhol classics including his earliest Campbell's Soup Can series, his well-known portrait of Marilyn Monroe, and his Pop Art masterpiece Brillo Soap Pads Box. Another highlight of this section is Warhol's original installation Silver Clouds, composed of a room full of silver balloons. Visitors then walk through these balloons that are suspended in mid-air.

Film was another important aspect of Warhol's work. Aside from his achievements in painting and screen printing, there is his classic 8-hour portrait of New York’s Empire State Building (1964) revealing his continuing influence on younger generations of filmmakers and video artists.

Part Four: 1970s-1980s Height of Fame

The 1970s was an incredibly exciting time for Warhol. He moved to a larger studio on 860 Broadway. Interview magazine, which he founded in 1969, became a chronicle of the period and brought together the worlds of art, fashion, film, high society and modeling. Hundreds of portrait commissions from wealthy socialites, music and film stars, and other clients ensued as Warhol’s vast social network grew. In addition to a large number of celebrity portraits, this section includes self-photos of Warhol. Every silkscreen portrait was made from a Polaroid photo.

Having reached the zenith of success in the art world, Warhol chose to collaborate with a number of young emerging artists in the 1980s, as well as branching out beyond art into business. Warhol launched the television programsAndy Warhol's T.V and Andy Warhol's Fifteen Minutes. He appeared on Saturday Night Live, as well as numerous print and television advertisements. On display is a comprehensive collection of photographs of Warhol at social events, his huge picture'Reflection' [t1] and his final series, 'Self-Portrait'.

Also available to view is another of Warhol's art projects, Time Capsules. Time Capsules encompasses the work of three decades: from the early 1960s to Warhol's death in 1987. The exhibit is composed of 612 cases (mainly standard size cardboard boxes), the sort in which Warhol used to store his everyday possessions. During the move to Broadway Warhol had the idea of using cardboard boxes for his 'Time Capsules' series, as a way of dealing with the clutter in his studio and office. Warhol selected a portion of his everyday mundane documents including letters, magazines, newspapers, presents, photographs, and company records, and stored them in cardboard boxes. These documents are a unique source of illumination on Warhol's private world as well as the social, art and cultural context of his time.


About Curator

Gong Yan

Artist, Curator, Director of Power Station of Art, Chief-Editor of Art World magazine.

After graduated from Ecole national superieur des Beaux Arts in Paris, Gong Yan returned to China and established “O Art Center” in Shanghai Institute of Visual Arts. O Art Center focuses on unstable media art and city research. In 2002 and 2006, Gong Yan’s work had participated in Shanghai Biennial. In 2007, she was nominated artistic director of Shanghai E-Arts Festival, in 2008, she was invited as jury member of Ars Electronica Linz Austria. Gong Yan had curated exhibitions, such as “Body Media-International Interactive Art Exhibition ”(2007), “Ordinary Architecture—The Chinese Pavilion in the 11th International Architecture Venice Biennale”(2008), “Andy Warhol :15 Minutes Eternal”(2013), “Mobile Architecture: Yona Friedman” (2015), “Snacks”(2016), “Yu Youhan PSA Collection Series” (2017), “Toyo Ito: On the Stream” (2017), etc.


Exhibition Works

$ (9),1982,101.6 x 81.3 cm,screen print on Lenox Museum Board,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Brillo Soap Pads Box,1964,43.2 x 43.2 x 35.6 cm,silkscreen ink and house paint on plywood,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Endangered Species: Giant Panda,1983,96.5 x 96.5 cm,screen print on Lenox Museum Board,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Endangered Species: San Francisco Silverspot,1983,96.5 x 96.5 cm,screen print on Lenox Museum Board,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Campbell's Soup I: Tomato,1968,88.9 x 58.4 cm,screen print on paper,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc

Endangered Species: Bighorn Ram,1983,96.5 x 96.5 cm,screen print on Lenox Museum Board,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Flowers,91.4 x 91.4 cm,1970,screen print on paper,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Time Capsule-23 (partial contents),1939-1982;Bulk 1982-1983,Mixed archival materials,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Sandal,1950s,17.5 x 18.1 cm,ink, graphite, tempera, and registration tape on Strathmore paper,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Self-Portrait,1986,203.2 x 193 cm,acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Are You "Different"?,1985-1986,50.8 x 40.6 cm,acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Self-Portrait,1979,72.4 x 55.9 cm,facsimile of an original Polaroid™ 20 X 24" print,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Folding Screen,1950s,163.8 x 127 cm,tempera and ink on cardboard and wooden screen,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Self-Portrait,1953,27.9 x 21.6 cm,ink on bond paper,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Sunset,1972,screen print on paper,86.4 x 86.4 cm,The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.


Installation Views